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HOW TO BRUSH YOUR TEETH

The first step is to choose a good toothbrush. You always want to use a soft brush with a small head. A soft brush is hard enough to remove plaque, yet gentle enough not to damage your teeth or gums.

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The next issue is to select a good toothpaste. In general, any toothpaste that contains Fluoride will do the job, unless you have special needs that are determined by your dentist. Two of the best brands of toothpastes are Colgate Total and Crest Multicare.

The first rule of brushing is to start from a specific location and work your way to the opposite side, continuing all the way through the whole mouth so that you end where you started. This way you won't miss any area. Usually a pea-sized amount of toothpaste is enough. An adequate brushing should at least take 2 minutes and preferably around 4 minutes.

There are a variety of techniques for brushing your teeth, but one of the most popular ones is described here:

Hold the brush at a 45 degree angle toward the teeth and gums. Gently press against the gums so the tips of the bristles go in between the gum and the teeth. Then apply a few lateral strokes and roll down the brush to sweep the plaque away from the teeth and the gum. Repeat this motion 6 to 10 times and move on to the next area of 2 to 3 teeth. If your mouth is full of foam, spit and continue brushing. Your brushing is completed when you have brushed all the surfaces of your teeth, not when your mouth is full! On chewing surfaces, short strokes work best to get the plaque out of the grooves and pits. When brushing the back side of your front teeth, hold your brush vertically to be able to reach the teeth better.

As far as frequency of brushing is concerned, ideally you want to brush your teeth after each meal. But if you can’t, brush at least twice a day- after breakfast and before going to bed.

If you have any questions about brushing technique in or around Logan, give us a call today!

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How to Floss Your Teeth

The surfaces that are between teeth are not accessible to brush; therefore, the best way to clean them is by flossing. The frequency of flossing is like brushing and ideally after each meal, though one time a day (before going to bed) is the minimum necessary.

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To start, cut a piece of dental floss (approximately 2 feet). Wrap both sides of the floss around your middle fingers. Using your index and thumb, glide the floss in between all your teeth one by one. When flossing, make sure you are not cutting your gums. The goal is to clean the teeth surfaces, not the gums. In the space in between teeth, press the floss against each side of the tooth (hug the tooth) and gently move it back and forth and up and down. Then move to the opposite surface of the adjacent tooth.

If you have any questions about flossing your teeth and you live in or around Logan, give us a call today!

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Electric Brush versus Manual Brushes

There have been multiple studies comparing the effectiveness of manual brushes as opposed to electric brushes.

Although not all electric brushes are the same, these studies conclude that in general electric brushes are more efficient in controlling plaque than manual brushes. Theoretically, you can do a very good brushing with a regular hand brush, but the movements of an electric brush make the task easier and more effective.

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Also, some electric brushes (Sonicare) produce sonic vibrations that are difficult to mimic with a hand brush! Other electric brushes like Oral-B and Rotadent have small heads that help you access hard-to-reach areas of your mouth. This aspect is more important when you are talking about someone with orthodontic braces or a history of gum disease.

If you have any questions about electric toothbrushes and you live in or around Logan, give us a call today!

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Dental Health and Your Diet

Sugar is the main cause of dental decay when there are bacteria present. More significant than the amount of sugar you eat is the frequency of consumption.

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Probably the worst thing you can do to your teeth is to drink a soda and have a sip every few minutes over a long period of time; the same is true for snacking. It is recommended that if you want to have a snack or soda or juice it is better to have it after food, as dessert, or have it in one sitting. Eating or drinking something sweet over an extended period of time creates a constant supply of sugar for bacteria that causes tooth decay!

It is important to be aware of all the sources of sugar that are out there. It is not just everything that is sweet, but anything that can turn to sugar like pieces of bread. Cutting down your sugar intake is good for cavity prevention, as well as your general health.

But what about when you have to have sugar? The best way to avoid cavities is to prevent the sugar from staying next to your teeth. Brushing after eating sugar, rinsing your mouth with Fluoride mouth wash, or chewing sugarless gum can help. However, nothing has the effect of avoiding sugar!

Is there any kind of food that prevents tooth decay? Well, not really. Some people believed that chewing foods like apples and carrots may have some plaque removal effect, but they still contain some sugar so any advantage is not clear.

Another group of food that causes significant damage to teeth structure is acidic foods. If in frequent contact with teeth, things like lime, lemon, and grapefruit can cause serious irreversible damage (erosion) to your teeth.

If you have any questions about diet and dental health and you live in or around Logan, give us a call today!

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Fluoride and Decay Prevention

Many years ago scientists started to notice that children who were born and raised in areas with natural fluoride in drinking water had fewer cavities than children in other areas. Fluoride absorbed by your body when teeth were forming (during mother’s pregnancy to early childhood) integrates into the structure of enamel and makes it stronger.

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After teeth eruption, fluoride found in your toothpaste, mouthwash, or in what your dentist places on your teeth still has a positive effect on your teeth. It strengthens the enamel and reduces the chance of tooth decay.

If you have children and live in an area that has no fluoride in its drinking water, you should consult your dentist and physician about fluoride tablets that are available for children.

If you have any questions about Fluoride treatment and you live in Logan or the surrounding area, give us a call today!

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Dental Videos

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Nursing or “Baby Bottle” Decay

Baby bottle tooth decay, also known as Early Childhood Caries (ECC), is the result of frequent, prolonged contact with liquids that contain sugars such as fruit juices, milk, formula or any other sweetened drinks. Human breast milk is also a contributor to baby bottle tooth decay. As the sugars break down in the mouth, bacteria start feeding on the sugars, produce acids and cause tooth decay.

If left untreated, decayed teeth can cause pain, discomfort and even severe infections. Not only can decayed teeth affect your child’s comfort, eating habits and sleeping patterns but primary teeth also help guide permanent teeth into their proper place. If the primary teeth are damaged or absent, they are often unable to help guide permanent teeth into their proper position, possibly causing future crowding or crooked adult teeth. Badly decayed baby teeth could lead to an abscessed tooth, with the infection spreading to adjacent teeth and the gums.  

Listed below are some tips to preventing baby bottle tooth decay:

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  • To calm your baby, don't give a bottle filled with sugary liquids; instead, give plain water or use a pacifier.
  • Don’t coat your baby’s pacifier in a sweetener of any kind such as sugar, or honey as a way to comfort them.
  • Don't put your baby to bed with a bottle filled with sugary liquids. Plain water is best.
  • Use a wet cloth or gauze to wipe your child's teeth and gums after each feeding. This helps remove any excess sugar preventing the chance for bacteria to form.

If you live in or around Logan and you suspect your child has baby bottle tooth decay, contact our office or schedule an appointment for a consultation today.

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Teeth Sealants

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Sealants are thin layers of resin that are placed on the pits, fissures, and grooves of molars to prevent decay on these surfaces.

The majority of decay on back teeth starts in the grooves and pits of chewing surfaces, especially during the first few years after their eruption. Sealing these surfaces with composite resins prevents this kind of decay.

Sealants are one of the most effective methods of preventing decay on the surfaces where they are placed. Although it is still a possibility that decay may develop on surfaces in between teeth, sealants significantly reduce the overall chance of having cavities.

If you have any questions about dental sealants and you live in or around Logan, give us a call today!

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 Why Primary Teeth Are Important

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Many parents ask why baby teeth are so important to their child’s health when they fall out on their own eventually. Primary teeth stay in place until a permanent tooth underneath erupts, pushing it out and taking it’s place. These teeth are important to the natural development and growth of what will become your child’s permanent smile. Emphasizing healthy oral habits at an early age also promotes good nutrition and encourages a positive self-image.

In some instances, when a child loses baby teeth too soon, a space maintainer may be recommended to prevent space loss and future dental damage. Speak with one of our doctors to find out if this is an option for your child. If you live in or around Logan, call or schedule an appointment today.

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FAQ's

May I accompany my child?

Yes, parents are encouraged to come into the treatment area during their dental visit to see the office and to meet Dr. Gehring. The staff will make a great effort to ensure that your child feels comfortable in our office. After all, that's what we are truly here for!

Dr. Gehring encourages great communication regarding treatment options and diagnosis.  His practice is run a bit different than some other pediatric offices.  Dr. Gehring has an open door policy where he encourages parents to come to the treatment rooms with their child if they so choose.  He feels communication is more effective and questions are best addressed in that setting.  Children also usually feel more comfortable with a parent close by.  Of course this is just an option that each family can make individually. If a parent or guardian chooses to accompany their child into the treatment area, we suggest that they act as a "silent & supportive" observer only. It is important for us to establish cooperation and trust directly with each patient.

What about follow up visits?

Based on the results of your child's first visit and initial examination, we may recommend one or more follow-up visits for the completion of any existing dental treatment. We also recommend that your child be seen every six months for preventive care. We will mail you a postcard reminding you of your child's scheduled six-month checkup.

During these biannual appointments, Dr. Gehring will also assess your child's dental and skeletal development and how it relates to future orthodontic treatment. Dr. Gehring is trained in the application of interceptive orthodontics and will regularly discuss treatment options if needed.

Many times extensive and costly dental and orthodontic treatment can be avoided through timely pediatric care as the face, jaws and teeth are developing.

When should my child first see a dentist?

 "First visit by first birthday" sums it up. Your child should visit a pediatric dentist when the first tooth comes in, usually between six and twelve months of age. Early examination and preventive care will protect your child’s smile now and in the future.

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What is a Pediatric Dentist?

Pediatric dentistry is a specialized field of dental treatment, revolving around the dental care needs of children. A pediatric dentist has taken two to three additional years of  specialized schooling beyond that of regular or general dentists, in order to learn about the best treatment for pediatric or children’s dental issues.

What Does a Pediatric Dentist Do?

A pediatric dentist provides many dental treatments to children, ranging from routine dental care – such as cleanings – to x-ray examinations and working to determine if a child’s jaw and teeth are developing properly. For most pediatric dentists, there is a lot of emphasis on preventative dental care. This is because early intervention and proper dental practices can make a child much less likely to develop dental problems – such as cavities or occlusions – as they progress into adolescence and then adulthood.

Your child’s pediatric dentist and dental assistants will likely spend a lot of time with your child, teaching the child how to properly care for their teeth and gums. This dental education – at an early age – can stay with a child for a lifetime.  It is essential to establish regular, healthy dental habits such as flossing and proper tooth brushing. The pediatric dentist may also choose to perform procedures such as tooth sealants, which help to prevent cavities.

Pediatric Dentists Comfort Children

You know that some adults have an exaggerated fear of seeing the dentist. Some children experience the same dread. A dental office can be a scary place for a child, with all of the specialized dental equipment and the sounds made by some of the dental tools. However, an experienced pediatric dentist – your child’s pediatric dentist – knows how to work with a frightened child, comforting them and relaxing them before proceeding with an exam or any treatment processes. A good pediatric dentist will set your child at ease, explaining everything that is going on, and never creating an atmosphere of fear.

A positive dental experience – especially for a young child – is likely to result in the child growing into an adult who is comfortable with routine dental care and who regularly gets dental checkups. Establishing a good relationship with their own dental needs, at a young age, means your child is going to have less dental problems as they age, avoiding many of the dental pitfalls of their peers.

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Composite fillings (Tooth-Colored Fillings)

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When considering tooth fillings, one of the options available are composite fillings which are made from durable plastics that are similar in color to natural teeth. Because the composite fillings are tooth-colored, they look more natural and are less noticeable compared to other types of fillings.

Another benefit of tooth-colored fillings is that they are compatible with sealants allowing your child’s dentist to perform both procedures in a single sitting preventing further decay. There are other advantages to composite, tooth-colored fillings, most importantly the capability of bonding to tooth structure. Also in many cases they can be repaired by addition of more composite material.

Speak with one of our doctors to find out which kind of filling is best for your child.

If you live in or around Logan, call or schedule an appointment today.

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Dental Crowns & Bridges

A crown (cap) is a restoration that is placed on teeth that have lost a lot of their structure. There are various types of crowns, ranging from full porcelain to full metal crowns. Your dentist will explain the advantages and disadvantages of each kind for you.

Crowns may also be used to securely attach a bridge if the structure of the surrounding teeth is inadequate. A bridge is a dental appliance that is used to replace one or more missing teeth. They are designed to be cosmetically appealing and to restore proper occlusion. Like crowns, bridges are fully customizable and made of various materials, including porcelain and metals. Although not as permanent as a cap, bridges are bonded to the surrounding teeth and only removable by your dentist.

Both crowns and bridges are created to match the color, height, texture, and overall appearance of your teeth. Most crowns and bridges will last for life, eliminating the need to replace them unless they fall out or become loose. You may prolong the durability of your crowns and bridges by practicing good oral hygiene and visiting your dentist for regular check-ups and cleanings.

If you live in or around Logan , give us a call today to schedule your appointment.

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Teeth Whitening

Teeth stains are inevitable due to our consumption of a variety of foods and drinks (soda, spicy food, coffee, etc.). However, advanced teeth whitening technology has enabled dentists to whiten teeth without adversely affecting the tooth structure.

Almost all whitening methods are similar in concept, but some are much more effective because of the way the whitening material is delivered to the teeth. Another contributing factor is the concentration of the material, which is why less potent over-the-counter whitening systems usually don’t give patients the results they are hoping for.

The two main methods of professional whitening are tray whitening and in-office whitening. In tray whitening, an impression is taken and a custom tray is made for the patient. Then, a supply of whitening gel is given to the patient and he/she wears the tray for a few hours each day (techniques differ) for a period of time until an acceptable result is achieved. Sensitivity of the teeth is a normal side-effect of this whitening method and is almost always transitional.

On the other hand, in-office whitening is the most efficient means of whitening. There are a number of different types used, but the process is very similar for these methods; you can have your teeth whitened in one session and achieve significant results. Your dentist can give you more detailed information and help you decide which method is more suitable for you and your teeth.

If you have any questions about teeth whitening and cosmetic dentistry and you live in or around Logan , give us a call today!

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Advantages and Uses of a Dental Mouth Guard

Mouth guards – also known as night guards or sports guards – are designed to protect the teeth and jaw from damage. They are recommended by dentists for individuals of all ages who are at a higher risk for developing oral health problems due to grinding of the teeth, bite obstructions and impact sustained from contact sports. There are many types of dental guards, each of which are customized to fit the patient’s needs.

Night Guards

Individuals who suffer from bruxism, or teeth grinding, find that a night guard can help achieve a better quality of sleep, as well as prevent sore and tense muscles around the jaw from constant biting during the night. A night guard can also protect the teeth from wearing down due to grinding and pressure, which could otherwise cause thinning of the enamel and even make the teeth more prone to decay over time.

For TMJ patients, dentists utilize night guards as a means for helping correct the condition and also for alleviating TMJ pain and symptoms. With regular use of a night guard, TMJ sufferers can experience fewer TMJ-related headaches, less clenching, less popping and clicking of the jaw, fewer toothaches and less ringing in the ears.

Sports Bite Guards

Sports accidents are common, and a bite guard is especially beneficial to athletes who participate in high-contact activities. It is not uncommon to hear of athletes who have sustained serious damage to the teeth and tissues of the mouth that could have been easily prevented or minimized by a mouth guard. Football, hockey, soccer and basketball are examples of just a few high-risk sports in which participants should wear mouth protection.

As an added benefit, bite guards are generally composed of materials that are naturally absorptive to force, meaning the guards not only protect the teeth, but may also lessen the force to the entire skull and brain should the wearer suffer an injury.

The Advantage of Customized Night and Bite Guards

Although night guards are available over the counter at drug stores and other retailers, there is an advantage to getting a customized night or bite guard from a dentist. Professional dental guards provide the most accurate fit, because the dentist uses an impression of the patient’s teeth and natural bite, from which a laboratory constructs a custom guard. Without the accurate fit that a professional night or sports guard provides, the guard can become loose or even fall out of the mouth.

On the other hand, bypassing a professional dental guard fitting and customization can lead to even more problems in the future. Individuals who purchase an over-the-counter dental guard that is improperly fitted often find that they develop even more pain or complications with prolonged usage. These guards are also typically made of inferior materials than professional guards, meaning they need to be replaced more often.

Should you decide to be fitted for a professional dental guard, your dentist will analyze your particular mouth guard needs and make a recommendation for either a hard or soft material based on a professional analysis. He or she can pinpoint targeted support areas for a better bite adjustment that will not leave the muscles and tissues in and around your jaw feeling sore or inflamed. Additionally, with the professional supervision and oversight that a dentist provides, you can quickly identify whether adjustments need to be made to your night or sports guard over time.

Caring for a Night or Sports Guard

In order to get the most effective use of a night or sports guard, proper care is essential. The guard must be thoroughly cleaned with cool, soapy water after each use, as well as regularly inspected for tears, holes or other wear. Furthermore, a dentist should inspect the mouth guard at each exam or teeth cleaning to ensure it is still providing proper protection.

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What is an Orthodontist

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As children grow older and as their mouth and teeth start to mature, most parents start thinking about implementing orthodontic treatment. Most questions about early orthodontics is about when your child should receive orthodontic treatment. Unfortunately, there is no universal answer to this question. A child receives orthodontic treatment when the time is right for them.

This is why it is important to be in contact with a dental professional throughout the course of your child’s dental care. Dr. Gehring can assess the individual needs of your child and let you know when orthodontic treatment can be started. Also, by having  Dr. Gehring treat your child, he can detect problems at an early stage to make your child’s orthodontic experience the best it can possibly be.

If you have any questions about how early orthodontics works with us and how we can help your child, please give us a call.

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Tooth Eruption

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Even though they aren’t visible, children’s primary teeth begin forming before they are even born. At around the four to six month mark the primary teeth begin pushing through the gums. By the age of three, all 20 primary teeth have erupted.

Permanent teeth begin appearing around age 6, starting with the first molars and lower central incisors. This process continues until around age 21. Adults have 28 permanent teeth, or up to 32 including wisdom teeth.

Even before your baby’s first tooth erupts you can use a warm clean washcloth to gently swab the gums clean after every meal. When the first tooth erupts you can gently brush with a soft toothbrush to get them used to having something in their mouths. Do not use toothpaste until your child is at least 2 years old. At around age two you can begin applying a pea-sized amount. Emphasizing healthy dental habits at an early age contributes to better oral health in the future.

If you live in or around Logan and have a question about your child's tooth eruption, call our office today!

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Your Child's First Visit

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Your child’s first dental visit should be scheduled around their first birthday. One of the most important reasons for this visit is to familiarize your child with the dental office environment and to ease any anxiety associated with future visits. During this time the dentist can examine your child’s dental development and address dental issues such as baby bottle decay, or any teething tenderness while providing preventive care when needed. On this first visit, a gentle but thorough examination will be performed to monitor growth and development and address any problem areas. Early examination provides your child with preventive dental care while establishing healthy dental habits at an early age.

Dr. Gehring encourages great communication regarding treatment options and diagnosis.  His practice is run a bit different than some other pediatric offices.  Dr. Gehring has an open door policy where he encourages parents to come to the treatment rooms with their child if they so choose.  He feels communication is more effective and questions are best addressed in that setting.  Children also usually feel more comfortable with a parent close by.  Of course this is just an option that each family can make individually.

To help ensure that your child’s future smile is a healthy, confident one. If you live in or around Logan, contact our office with any questions you may have or schedule a dental visit today.

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Children’s Dentistry

Childhood dental habits establish the foundation for oral health during adulthood. By training children about proper hygienic habits at an early age, parents and caregivers can set them up for a lifetime of good oral health.

Visiting the Dentist for the First Time

A child’s first visit to the dentist should fall around his or her first birthday. This is the time when many of the baby teeth have erupted into the gums, and it is approximately six months following the breakthrough of the first baby tooth. It is important to make visits to the dentist an exciting experience for young children. Parents should speak with children openly about an upcoming dental appointment and answer any questions a child may have about the experience.
Equally important is the dentist chosen to care for a child’s teeth. Although all dentists are qualified to care for a child’s oral health, many parents prefer the expertise and experience available from a pediatric dentist or a family dentist with experience caring for young patients. Furthermore, dentists with experience working with children are accustomed to squirming and are more likely to have a child-friendly office.

What to Expect

By the age of three, most children have 20 teeth often referred to as “baby teeth.” Children are born with these teeth, although they do not appear until several months of age. Although these teeth will eventually fall out – usually beginning around the child’s sixth birthday – they are still susceptible to decay until that time. During childhood, the dentist will inspect the baby teeth for cavities and signs of decay, as well as ensure the teeth are erupting normally. As the child grows, dental visits continue according to a schedule determined by the dental care provider.

Parents are also instructed on proper home dental care and advised of day-to-day habits that could cause early decay. Caution may be given about:

  • Pacifier usage (discontinue use by age 1)
  • Sending children to bed with bottles or sugary beverages
  • Using fluoridated toothpastes prior to age two

Caring for a Child’s Teeth between Office Visits

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At-home dental care is equally important as visiting the dentist on a regular basis. Even before the teeth erupt in a child’s mouth, the gums should be gently washed each day. Twice-daily brushing should begin as soon as the teeth break through the gums, although the teeth may initially be cleansed using water, rather than toothpaste. As the child gets older, it is safe to begin using children’s toothpaste as recommended by the child’s dental provider.

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Nitrous Oxide Gas

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Most children feel comfortable when visiting the dentist. Early exposure to the dentist helps younger patients to associate the dental office with feelings of relaxation. Some children however, may feel nervous before their visit or while sitting in the dental chair. Sometimes they need more than gentle care to feel relaxed. Nitrous Oxide gas is a safe sedative used to help your child relax during the dental visit while allowing the doctor to effectively treat your child.

Nitrous Oxide gas is a blend of oxygen and nitrous oxide. Before the procedure a fitted mask is placed over your child’s nose and as they breathe, the blend is absorbed through the lungs. At the end of the treatment, the nitrous gas is removed and has no lingering effects. One of the side effects during treatment is a sense of contentment and relaxation. One of the reasons why nitrous oxide gas is also known as “laughing gas.”

The use of nitrous oxide gas is very safe as it is rapidly absorbed, is reversible, and can be adjusted in concentration. Your child is fully conscious and keeps all of their natural reflexes while breathing the nitrous gas. If you live in or around Logan and are interested in learning more about the use of nitrous oxide gas during your child’s visits, or in other sedation alternatives, please contact our offices to answer any of your questions or schedule an appointment to find out if nitrous oxide regas is a suitable option for your child.

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Pulp Therapy (for baby teeth)

The pulp of a tooth is the inner, central core of the tooth and contains blood vessels and nerves. Dental caries (cavities) and trauma to the tooth are the primary reasons for children to undergo pulp therapy.

Your child may need pulp therapy if he/she has

  • Tooth pain for no apparent reason
  • A tooth that is sensitive to temperature changes
  • A broken tooth
  • A tooth with decay into the pulp chamber

The main purpose of pulp therapy is to prevent pain and premature loss of a tooth. Primary teeth are needed for chewing and speaking and serve as space savers for permanent teeth. Without the primary teeth to guide them, existing neighboring teeth can crowd in, causing permanent teeth to grow in crooked, tilted or be blocked from erupting altogether.

The two forms of pulp therapy for children's teeth are: vital pulp therapy for primary teeth (pulpotomy) and non-vital pulp therapy for primary teeth (pulpectomy).

Vital Pulp Therapy for Primary (Baby) Teeth

Vital pulp therapy is for cases in which the tooth’s pulp may be salvaged. The main purpose is to maintain and protect existing healthy pulp by removing the diseased pulp tissue within the crown portion of the tooth. Next, an agent is placed to prevent bacterial growth and to calm the remaining nerve tissue. This is followed by a final restoration (usually a stainless steel crown).

Non-Vital Pulp Therapy for Primary (Baby) Teeth

Non-vital pulp therapy is required when the entire pulp is diseased (into the root canal(s) of the tooth). During this treatment, the diseased pulp tissue is completely removed from all parts of the tooth. The canals are cleansed and filled with a special material meant to be naturally absorbed by the body while the root prepares for the primary tooth to fall out and be replaced by a permanent tooth. A crown is placed on the tooth to prevent fractures.

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If the pulp is severely damaged then your doctor may recommend removing the tooth entirely. If this is a case ask if space maintainers are necessary for future development.

If you live in or around Logan and you suspect your child is in need of pulp therapy, contact our office or schedule an appointment for a consultation today.

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Oral Sedation

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SEDATION APPOINTMENTS: If you are making a sedation appointment you may be asked to bring your child at a particular time. We have learned through experience that this procedure is best accepted during the earlier parts of the day.

Another alternative for helping nervous children relax at the dentist’s office is the use of sedation. When your child becomes so anxious that cooperating becomes difficult for them, sedation is an option. Sedation is a method in which medications are used to help your child relax during the dental visit and allow the doctor to effectively treat your child. Sedations tend to produce feelings of drowsiness and relaxation and are not meant to make your child unconscious.

Sedation is also a way to for the dentist to provide more effective treatment along with preventing injury that may result from uncontrolled movements in an anxious, uncooperative child.

When administered according to the sedation guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry by a pediatric dentist, sedation is a safe, effective option. If you live in or around Logan and are interested in learning more about the use of sedation during your child’s visits please contact our offices to answer any of your questions or schedule an appointment to find out if sedation is a suitable option for your child.

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Space Maintainers

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Primary teeth stay in place until a permanent tooth comes in from underneath its position and pushes it out, taking it’s place in the mouth. Some children lose their primary teeth too early due to accidents or dental disease. When this is the case, a space maintainer may be recommended by your dentist to prevent space loss and future dental problems. It is important to remember the fact that some teeth are not replaced until a child is 12 or 14 years old.

Space maintainers are appliances made of metal or plastic that are custom fit to your child’s mouth. Most children adjust to them quickly. Without a maintainer, the teeth can tilt or move toward the empty space and cause permanent teeth to come in crooked or not at all.

With empty space, the teeth beside the gap may tilt or shift into the empty space. When adjacent teeth shift into the empty space, they create crowding in the permanent teeth and they come in crooked or may even be blocked out.  If left untreated, the condition may require future orthodontic treatment. Space maintainers hold open the empty space left by a lost tooth. They steady the remaining teeth, preventing movement until the permanent tooth takes its natural position. It is more affordable to keep teeth in their normal positions with a space maintainer than to move them back in place with orthodontic treatment.

If you live in or around Logan, call us today to schedule your child's preventive consultation.

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Protecting Your Child’s Teeth During Sporting Events

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Mouth protectors are soft plastic appliances that shape themselves to the upper teeth and are important sports equipment. Not only do they protect the teeth but they also protect the lips, cheeks, and tongue and can protect your child from serious head injuries such as concussions and jaw fractures.

If your child is involved in a physical activity in which their head is in contact with other players or equipment then consider getting a mouth guard for your child today. There are various types of appliances available so call our offices for more information or to schedule an appointment with one of our doctors to find out

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Tongue Piercing

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Body piercing has become a popular form of body modification in today’s society. Tongue piercings are one particular procedure with high risks. Despite their popularity, it is important to know the associated risk factors with the piercing process.

There are many health risks involved with oral piercings some including chipped or cracked teeth, blood clots, blood poisoning, receding gums or scar tissue. Your mouth is home to millions of bacteria that can easily promote infection in an oral piercing. Your tongue could swell large enough to close off your airway, it can affect your speech and can even be a danger if swallowed.

Common symptoms after piercing include pain, swelling, infection, an increased flow of saliva and damage to gum tissue. Difficult-to-control bleeding or nerve damage can result if a blood vessel or nerve is cut by the piercing needle. Even without complications, healing takes four to six weeks.

Take the advice of the American Dental Association and just avoid oral piercings.

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